James Wooldridge Photojournalism James Wooldridge Photojournalism

may 2017

  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Bisaso Dauda builds the frame of a helicopter in Wakaliwood, Uganda’s rising action film industry based in the Kampala slum of Wakaliga. Dauda is wending it from scratch based on careful study of films like Rambo and choppers he has seen in the sky. The prop will be lifted by crane for filming.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Asimwe Apollo, a Wakaliwood actor, practices Kung Fu before rehearsal for their next film. The original Wakaliwood actors learned Kung Fu from Chinese films and magazines.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Kazibwe Ronald copies his lines from the handwritten script in the Wakaliwood rehearsal room, where the rafters are piled with props and the walls are lined with Wakaliwood film posters.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    A Wakaliwood actor sells copies of their latest film, “Once A Soja,” door to door in a Kampala suburb. The actors themselves sell their films to shops and shoppers in the suburbs and surrounding villages.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    The village of Buhoma, Uganda, is adjacent to the Bwindi Impenetrable National Forest, home of the endangered mountain gorillas.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    A gorilla feeds on leaves in Uganda's Bwindi Impenetrable National Forest. Tourists come from all over the world and pay the Ugandan government over $400 to see them.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Nyamishana Ivas demonstrates traditional Batwa cooking during the Batwa Experience, a cultural performance for tourists, in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Forest. The indigenous Batwa Pygmies were evicted from their forest with no compensation in 1991 to protect the mountain gorillas, despite their peaceful coexistence. The Batwa believed the gorillas were their cousins.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Batwa Pygmies perform a traditional dance during the Batwa Experience, a cultural performance for tourists in the Bwindi
    Forest. Today they are rarely allowed back into the forest, unless performing in the Batwa Experience or working as porters for gorilla trekkers, rare jobs for the Batwa.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Besigye John, a Mutwa (singular for Batwa) Pygmy man, rests in the Bwindi Forest after performing his people's traditions for tourists.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Benon, left, Zawadi and their youngest child Daisy stand by their home in Karehe, a Batwa village near Buhoma and the Bwindi Forest. The family of five squeezes into their tiny mud hut to sleep each night. Most Batwa live in tiny mud huts like this one. Benon, like most Batwa in Karehe, struggles with alcoholism.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Benon digs a hole for the community chairman. He is payed 5,000 shillings a day for the work, less than $2, which he uses at least partially for the day's alcohol.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Benon sits by the fire with his family after coming home drunk. Benon sometimes beats his wife and children, especially, but not only, when he is drunk.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Zawadi stands in her garden below her home in the morning before heading to work at the Redemption Song Foundation, an American-established organization aimed at helping the Batwa children of Karehe. Zawadi is the only Mutwa in Karehe who has a job, and the only one who doesn't drink.
  • may 2017 - James Wooldridge Photojournalism
    Zawadi cooks and tends the fire with her son Bosco outside their home. The family never knows if Benon will argue and resort to violence when he comes home. Zawadi has considered leaving Benon, but she has nowhere to go if she did. With a house and land of her own, Zawadi, and other Batwa victims of abuse, may have the power to leave their spouses.